Are Writing Conferences Worth the Cost?

I belong to a SCBWI writers’ group in Pennsylvania and had the pleasure of meeting with them this week to discuss, among other things, making and keeping writing goals.

Our fearless leader had a list of things that can distract us from our goals (internet, family, dirty laundry – my old nemesis), and a list of things that can help us achieve goals (writing groups, deadlines, conferences.)

But one person in our group thought conferences might belong in the ‘distractions’ column. After all, it’s a weekend where you are emphatically not writing. You’re talking, you’re listening, (if you are me, you are drinking) you’re absorbing – basically the opposite of writing.

If you are not at the stage where you are actively looking for an agent or editor—whether because you have not finished a manuscript, or because you already have one of those mythical unicorn-type people in your corner—it might seem like a conference is a waste of time.

Also, the expense, lord save us all. THE EXPENSE. If you get out of the experience losing only a few hundred dollars, you have gotten a BARGAIN. Travel costs, the basics of the workshop and add-ons like ms. reviews, round tables, dinner with faculty. It’s A Lot.

So, is it worth it? It can be. Here’s what I think can make conference going worthwhile.

  1. You’ve done all the hard work of getting your writing in good shape. You’ve polished the scat out of it. It’s ready for new eyes.
  2. You are ready to expand your circle of writerly-friends. From my first conference, I met the very talented Ramona Defelice Long and Becky Levine. Becky is an incredible crit partner and Ramona is just a joy. Neither of them live close to me. I wouldn’t have met them if I hadn’t gone to my first conference.*
  3. You want to try to pitch to agents. Personally, I hate pitching. I am terrible at all sports and this sounds like sports + the Inquisition. But nothing will focus the mind like knowing you have to reduce your book to its essence and make that essence sing. It’s scary. You may not be good at it. You have to try.
  4. The workshops speak to you. Some workshops will not be your cup of tea. You could never get me to go to Yoga For Writers. NEVER. But, Building an Online Platform? Revision the Right Way? LGBTQ in Middle Grade? Sign me up! The workshop descriptions should rev you up.
  5. The faculty are people you respect. You know how you know you’re ready for a conference? You have already (nicely, respectfully) stalked some of these people online. Meaning, you follow their twitter accounts, you’ve read their blogs, you know what books they represent and who they publish. Like the most amazing Hermione Granger ever, you have ‘swotted up’ and know all about them. Now it’s time to make those connections in person.

And of course, you have to be able to afford the conference. But – here’s the trick – there are A MILLION** conferences for you to choose from. There are the big ones once or twice a year (SCBWI, Writers Digest, Thrillfest, Bouchercon, just to name a few) and much smaller ones – one day workshops, weekend retreats that are primarily self guided. You can find some listings at the back of the latest issue of Writers Digest and you can find some at Shaw Guides (though, be careful. Some ‘conferences’ are really just dolled up B&B experiences without the faculty or experts on hand to make it worthwhile. Buyer beware.)

Another way to find conferences is to join an association (Sisters in Crime; SCBWI for children’s book writers), that either hosts conferences/workshops, or can list them on their site. Finally, look for regional conferences near where you live, to cut down on travel expenses.

So far, I have never regretted attending a conference. I have always made connections, learned something and come away a better writer. Your mileage may vary, but if you’ve never attended one before, take the plunge, if you can. If you are willing to work for it, it will be worth it.

I’m at two conferences this Spring;

Color of Children’s Literature, NYC April 8th

NJ SCBWI Annual Conference, New Brunswick, NJ, June 3rd.

Are you going to any conferences this year? Any that you have loved or loathed? Or are all conferences evil drains of your precious writing time? Let me know!

*I also met my agent Barbara Poelle at my first writers conference. I impressed her, I think, with the large quantities of bacon I was eating at breakfast. Somehow, she still chose to represent me.
**Not a million. I made that up.

2 thoughts on “Are Writing Conferences Worth the Cost?

  1. Nice reasons for going! I would add: 1) the joy of being surrounded by book/word people for those hours and days–people who “get” my level of nerddom and 2) the one sentence or quote or suggestion that clicks with my brain just when I need to hear it and sends me away with new inspiration or a new story idea or a new understanding of technique. I don’t think I’ve ever attended a conference and NOT heard this just one thing. And, btw, I am awesomely glad we met at that conference–I didn’t know it was your first! 😊

    Liked by 1 person

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